Emergency Medication

IN THE EVENT OF SUSPECTED ANAPHYLAXIS USE ADRENALINE AUTOINJECTOR IF AVAILABLE, THEN CALL 999, ASK FOR AN AMBULANCE AND STATE ‘ANAPHYLAXIS’.  

Medical advice, along with instructions on using the different types of adrenaline autoinjectors, is available on the NHS website.

If you have a serious allergy you are likely to be prescribed an adrenaline autoinjector (AAI), often referred to as an EpiPen, although there are other brands such as Jext and Emerade.

At first the idea of having to carry an AAI may be frightening, but the fact is this is a potentially life-saving piece of equipment and is easier to use than you might think.

Who can use someone else’s AAI in an emergency? Anyone can, as defined in the Human Medicines Act 2012.

To inject or not to inject? In the case of a reaction that might affect breathing or involves swelling of the tongue or throat, or if you even suspect this type of reaction, Epi First, Epi Fast.

Milder allergies such as hives, itching or sneezing may be treated with antihistamine tablets or liquids. Some patients carry inhalers as well as AAIs.

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